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Govt considers resuscitating Kalanga chieftainships

The government is considering resuscitating five Kalanga chieftainships which were abolished during the colonial era.

Between 1897 and 1960, the colonial government demoted those chiefs whom they thought were not loyal to them to headmen.

The demoted chiefs were Hikwa, Manguba, Hingwe, Chingababili and Habe.

In a letter addressed to Bulilima West Member of Parliament, Dingumuzi Phuti, Acting Director (Traditional Leadership Support Services) Mr J Mapungwana, said the families of the deposed chiefs should make submissions to the ministry.

“We kindly request that the clan representatives from the above-mentioned chieftainships that were downgraded submit applications for resuscitation to the Ministry for consideration by the Minister.

“Please note that resuscitations were put on hold following advice from the office of the Attorney General that resuscitations can only take place after the alignment of the Traditional Leaders Act to the constitution which is already underway. It is our hope that the process will be complete soon,” read part of the letter.

Phuti said he was pleased with the response from the Ministry as it brings back the dignity of Kalanga people.

“In an African setup, without a chief, we are not a people. Chiefs depict one’s culture, language and aspirations,” said Phuti.

He highlighted there is evidence that reveals these chiefs once existed.

“There are still some items stamped by Chief Hikwa. If he was there, where is he now?

“I possess a document written by Chingababili and his chieftaincy name was Luswina. I also have a picture of his jacket. All this evidence shows these chiefs were once there,” said Phuti.

He added: “Habe, the Ndlovu clan as big as it is how anyone dares say they do not have a chieftaincy”.

Phuti urged Kalanga people to stand up and support the idea.

He said some chiefs are already on the board and hope the process will be implemented soon.

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